Nature

As The Meg, a new sci-fi horror film about a giant shark, fills cinema screens worldwide, it’s worth pausing to appreciate the animal behind the screams. Carcharocles megalodon (or just Megalodon) is one of the most impressive creatures ever to have existed on Earth. Huge, voracious, and beautifully mysterious, megalodons were the largest known sharks
0 Comments
Aftershocks are a common feature of big earthquakes, but they usually occur relatively close to the tremor’s epicenter. For the first time, researchers have found evidence of earthquakes triggering seismic events on the other side of the globe, suggesting a ripple effect that could potentially be used to forecast catastrophes in the future.   Researchers
0 Comments
In a rare and fortuitous moment, scientists have caught Madagascar’s red-fronted lemurs (Eulemur rufifrons) gnawing on toxic millipedes and rubbing them all over their genitals and anuses.    The first-of-its-kind discovery was made in 2016 by Louise Peckre, an expert in primatology at the Leibniz Institute for Primate Research in Germany, when she was on
0 Comments
The world’s largest king penguin colony has dramatically collapsed, and as yet scientists just don’t know why. From 2 million members in the 1980s, including 500,000 breeding pairs, the population on the sub-Antarctic Île aux Cochons has shrunk to just 60,000 breeding pairs.   Using recent high-resolution satellite data from 2005 onwards, and helicopter and
0 Comments
Caribbean lizards that survived the tough 2017 hurricane season have larger toe pads, on both front and back limbs, report researchers. The work is first to demonstrate the effects of hurricane-induced natural selection.   The hyperactive 2017 season was one of the worst that the Atlantic Ocean region ever experienced. Hurricane Harvey hit in mid-August
0 Comments
After years of debate, the current geological epoch has finally been cut into three sections. While some geologists clearly think it’s a justified change, others feel the move was premature and deserved further discussion.   The International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) recently ratified the division of the Holocene into the Meghalayan, Northgrippian, and Greenlandian
0 Comments