Physics

A team of researchers from RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia has reportedly made a ‘once-in-a-decade discovery’ that will radically change how we do chemistry. The discovery? The creation of two-dimensional materials no thicker than a few atoms — something that’s never been seen before in nature.   The research that led to this incredible find was led
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Researchers have at last been able to model the behaviour of electrons under extreme densities and temperatures, similar to those found inside stars and planets. Although electrons are ubiquitous in our universe, carrying electrical current and determining the physical properties of materials, physicists have never before been able to describe the ways large numbers of
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Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson have won the Nobel Prize in chemistry “for developing cryo-electron microscopy for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution,” the Nobel committee announced Wednesday. Cryo-electron microscopy is “a cool method for imaging the materials of life,” said Nobel committee member Göran K. Hansson from Stockholm. The development
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Rainer Weiss, Barry C. Barish and Kip S. Thorne have won the 2017 Nobel Prize in physics. The three are members of the LIGO-Virgo detector collaboration that discovered gravitational waves. “This year’s prize is about a discovery that shook the world,” said the Nobel committee representative during a news conference in Stockholm on Tuesday.  
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Since the mid-twentieth century, two theories of physics have offered powerful yet incompatible models of the physical universe.  General relativity brings space and time together into the (then) portmanteau space-time, the curvature of which is gravity. It works really well on large scales, such as interplanetary or interstellar space.   But zoom into the subatomic, and things
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Scientists have discovered the existence of a type of particle that’s never previously been observed, which demonstrates unprecedented chemical stability for its kind. It’s big news for chemists and physicists – but the achievement isn’t just exciting for theoretical scientists, because, if researchers can figure out how to make it in the lab, it could
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Physicists have finally observed a quantum interaction between a group of four entangled electrons. Until now, this interaction was purely theoretical, but now it’s been caught in action by cleverly cooling a superconducting crystal and stressing it under high pressure. The results of this exciting experiment are now opening doors to further refining our knowledge of
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A two-step cooling process using lasers has allowed physicists to push molecules of calcium monofluoride down to a record low temperature, busting a barrier that until now has been impassable. Decades ago, chilling individual atoms to near absolute zero opened a new world of research for particle physicists. This latest breakthrough could also provide fertile
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Black holes are the most intense and mysterious cosmic phenomena in the Universe, and new research shows we understand even less about them than we thought we did. A long-standing assumption about the physics taking place in the space immediately surrounding these matter-consuming voids has been found to be incorrect, and the discovery could derail
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Chinese scientists have successfully sent information between entangled particles through sea water, the first time this type of quantum communication has been achieved underwater. In this proof-of-concept experiment, information was sent across a 3.3-metre (10.8-foot) long tank of seawater, but the researchers predict they should be able to use the same technique to send unhackable
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Electrons have been caught flowing through graphene like a liquid, reaching limits physicists thought were fundamentally impossible. This type of conductance is known as ‘superballistic’ flow, and this new experiment suggests it could revolutionise the way we conduct electricity. If that’s not crazy enough, the super-fast flows actually occur as a result of electrons bouncing
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